Clearance Form A


Steve Salamon
 

I have a question pertaining to B&O Operating Rules.  Was Clearance Form A sufficient for a crew to occupy an un-signaled branch line, or did that crew also need train-order authority? 
Section 3 of B&O's Clearance Form A refers to Rule S-241, stating "You are authorized to occupy _______________Subdivision/s per Rule 241".  Unfortunately I don't have a Rulebook in my collection that spells out Rule 241.  Can anyone advise what that rule was?  Thanks.

Steve Salamon  


Tom Gray
 

Well, Steve, the short answer is : It depends.    Form A's, WITH or WITHOUT  orders were the authority to occupy a given territory, but in any case the conductor and engineer and (brakemen were expected to read and understand) at least.  The blank or unused portion of which were crossed out.   Rule 241 is not in my 1953 rule book, but I believe is probably the same as 237 that covers train movements and circumstances that require either a 19 or 31 order and even the correct wording. to be used. Some one I am sure will correct me if i am mistaken.

Tom Gray 

On Monday, June 21, 2021, 7:58:54 AM PDT, Steve Salamon via groups.io <oldrivets4800@...> wrote:


I have a question pertaining to B&O Operating Rules.  Was Clearance Form A sufficient for a crew to occupy an un-signaled branch line, or did that crew also need train-order authority? !9 and 31 orders were
Section 3 of B&O's Clearance Form A refers to Rule S-241, stating "You are authorized to occupy _______________Subdivision/s per Rule 241".  Unfortunately I don't have a Rulebook in my collection that spells out Rule 241.  Can anyone advise what that rule was?  Thanks.

Steve Salamon  


Fran Giacoma
 

Steve,

My B&O rulebook dated 4/26/1953, updated to 3/1/1960 has no rule S-241. The highest number is 237 which describes acceptable abbreviations to use in writing train orders. The Clearance Card Form A in use in that rule book is the long, 9 section one. 

My Chessie System rulebook dated 4/27/1969, which is almost the same as the one with the C&O/B&O logo on the cover with the same date, has Rule S-241 allowing the dispatcher to authorize a single train to occupy a subdivision without train orders. The subdivision using S-241 must be identified in the Special Instructions of the timetable. The Clearance Form A in use in that rulebook is the short 3 section one with Section 3 authorizing occupation of a subdivision per rule S-241.

Copies of both forms are attached.

 

I suspect that between the dates of the two rulebooks, there developed a need to allow trains to occupy subdivisions using less paperwork (ie. train orders) and thus save money due to less manpower (operators) and facilities (towers) required. 

 

Comment and clarification requested from B&O employees and others with rulebooks that I may have missed in that time period.

 

Fran Giacoma

 


John King
 

Steve and Fran,

 

Here is the rule in use on the Monongah Division.  The following is from the Dispatcher’s train sheet dated February 15, 1972.  Locals that operated out of Cowen, Buckhannon and Grafton received the authorization when they went onto “one train at a time” coal branches..  

Locals using the S-241 rule operated that day to: 

Berryburg Branch (4 Units, 2 leading and 2 helpers)

Century Branch (3 units, 1 leading and 2 helpers)

Belington (1 unit)

Pickens Branch (2 units)

SC&M (6 units, 3 and 3)

Gauley River Branch (Two runs, AM and PM trains).  (both with 4 units, 2 leading and 2 helpers)

This is the page showing the authorizations for those local trains.  Note that the Belington job is listed twice.  That is because they train ran over the WM from Belington to Coalton so separate authorizations were needed. 

 

 

John King

 

 

From: main@BaltimoreAndOhioRailroadList.groups.io [mailto:main@BaltimoreAndOhioRailroadList.groups.io] On Behalf Of Fran Giacoma
Sent: Monday, June 21, 2021 4:21 PM
To: main@BaltimoreAndOhioRailroadList.groups.io
Subject: Re: [BaltimoreAndOhioRailroadList] Clearance Form A

 

Steve,

My B&O rulebook dated 4/26/1953, updated to 3/1/1960 has no rule S-241. The highest number is 237 which describes acceptable abbreviations to use in writing train orders. The Clearance Card Form A in use in that rule book is the long, 9 section one. 

My Chessie System rulebook dated 4/27/1969, which is almost the same as the one with the C&O/B&O logo on the cover with the same date, has Rule S-241 allowing the dispatcher to authorize a single train to occupy a subdivision without train orders. The subdivision using S-241 must be identified in the Special Instructions of the timetable. The Clearance Form A in use in that rulebook is the short 3 section one with Section 3 authorizing occupation of a subdivision per rule S-241.

Copies of both forms are attached.

 

I suspect that between the dates of the two rulebooks, there developed a need to allow trains to occupy subdivisions using less paperwork (ie. train orders) and thus save money due to less manpower (operators) and facilities (towers) required. 

 

Comment and clarification requested from B&O employees and others with rulebooks that I may have missed in that time period.

 

Fran Giacoma

 


Steve Salamon
 

Fran, John & Tom - thanks for your most helpful responses regarding Rule 241 and Clearance Form A.  It would make sense to have such a rule for certain branch lines that would typically see only one crew a day.  B&O had a fair number of such lines in coal country, and some rural branches on other parts of the system.  No need for a train order if movement on the branch could be authorized by Form A and no other trains would be on the line.  

Steve Salamon  

On Monday, June 21, 2021, 05:40:25 PM EDT, John King via groups.io <e27ca@...> wrote:


Steve and Fran,

 

Here is the rule in use on the Monongah Division.  The following is from the Dispatcher’s train sheet dated February 15, 1972.  Locals that operated out of Cowen, Buckhannon and Grafton received the authorization when they went onto “one train at a time” coal branches..  

Locals using the S-241 rule operated that day to: 

Berryburg Branch (4 Units, 2 leading and 2 helpers)

Century Branch (3 units, 1 leading and 2 helpers)

Belington (1 unit)

Pickens Branch (2 units)

SC&M (6 units, 3 and 3)

Gauley River Branch (Two runs, AM and PM trains).  (both with 4 units, 2 leading and 2 helpers)

This is the page showing the authorizations for those local trains.  Note that the Belington job is listed twice.  That is because they train ran over the WM from Belington to Coalton so separate authorizations were needed. 

 

 

John King

 

 

From: main@BaltimoreAndOhioRailroadList.groups.io [mailto:main@BaltimoreAndOhioRailroadList.groups.io] On Behalf Of Fran Giacoma
Sent: Monday, June 21, 2021 4:21 PM
To: main@BaltimoreAndOhioRailroadList.groups.io
Subject: Re: [BaltimoreAndOhioRailroadList] Clearance Form A

 

Steve,

My B&O rulebook dated 4/26/1953, updated to 3/1/1960 has no rule S-241. The highest number is 237 which describes acceptable abbreviations to use in writing train orders. The Clearance Card Form A in use in that rule book is the long, 9 section one. 

My Chessie System rulebook dated 4/27/1969, which is almost the same as the one with the C&O/B&O logo on the cover with the same date, has Rule S-241 allowing the dispatcher to authorize a single train to occupy a subdivision without train orders. The subdivision using S-241 must be identified in the Special Instructions of the timetable. The Clearance Form A in use in that rulebook is the short 3 section one with Section 3 authorizing occupation of a subdivision per rule S-241.

Copies of both forms are attached.

 

I suspect that between the dates of the two rulebooks, there developed a need to allow trains to occupy subdivisions using less paperwork (ie. train orders) and thus save money due to less manpower (operators) and facilities (towers) required. 

 

Comment and clarification requested from B&O employees and others with rulebooks that I may have missed in that time period.

 

Fran Giacoma

 


John King
 

The branches where the rule applied were shown in the newer post 1969 C&O style and later Chessie timetables under the heading “Designation and Use of Main Track”.    There were none shown in my Baltimore and Cumberland Division timetables but many in the Monongah Division timetables.

 

John K.

 

From: main@BaltimoreAndOhioRailroadList.groups.io [mailto:main@BaltimoreAndOhioRailroadList.groups.io] On Behalf Of Steve Salamon via groups.io
Sent: Monday, June 21, 2021 10:28 PM
To: main@BaltimoreAndOhioRailroadList.groups.io
Subject: Re: [BaltimoreAndOhioRailroadList] Clearance Form A

 

Fran, John & Tom - thanks for your most helpful responses regarding Rule 241 and Clearance Form A.  It would make sense to have such a rule for certain branch lines that would typically see only one crew a day.  B&O had a fair number of such lines in coal country, and some rural branches on other parts of the system.  No need for a train order if movement on the branch could be authorized by Form A and no other trains would be on the line.  

 

Steve Salamon  

 

On Monday, June 21, 2021, 05:40:25 PM EDT, John King via groups.io <e27ca@...> wrote:

 

 

Steve and Fran,

 

Here is the rule in use on the Monongah Division.  The following is from the Dispatcher’s train sheet dated February 15, 1972.  Locals that operated out of Cowen, Buckhannon and Grafton received the authorization when they went onto “one train at a time” coal branches..  

Locals using the S-241 rule operated that day to: 

Berryburg Branch (4 Units, 2 leading and 2 helpers)

Century Branch (3 units, 1 leading and 2 helpers)

Belington (1 unit)

Pickens Branch (2 units)

SC&M (6 units, 3 and 3)

Gauley River Branch (Two runs, AM and PM trains).  (both with 4 units, 2 leading and 2 helpers)

This is the page showing the authorizations for those local trains.  Note that the Belington job is listed twice.  That is because they train ran over the WM from Belington to Coalton so separate authorizations were needed. 

 

 

John King

 

 

From: main@BaltimoreAndOhioRailroadList.groups.io [mailto:main@BaltimoreAndOhioRailroadList.groups.io] On Behalf Of Fran Giacoma
Sent: Monday, June 21, 2021 4:21 PM
To: main@BaltimoreAndOhioRailroadList.groups.io
Subject: Re: [BaltimoreAndOhioRailroadList] Clearance Form A

 

Steve,

My B&O rulebook dated 4/26/1953, updated to 3/1/1960 has no rule S-241. The highest number is 237 which describes acceptable abbreviations to use in writing train orders. The Clearance Card Form A in use in that rule book is the long, 9 section one. 

My Chessie System rulebook dated 4/27/1969, which is almost the same as the one with the C&O/B&O logo on the cover with the same date, has Rule S-241 allowing the dispatcher to authorize a single train to occupy a subdivision without train orders. The subdivision using S-241 must be identified in the Special Instructions of the timetable. The Clearance Form A in use in that rulebook is the short 3 section one with Section 3 authorizing occupation of a subdivision per rule S-241.

Copies of both forms are attached.

 

I suspect that between the dates of the two rulebooks, there developed a need to allow trains to occupy subdivisions using less paperwork (ie. train orders) and thus save money due to less manpower (operators) and facilities (towers) required. 

 

Comment and clarification requested from B&O employees and others with rulebooks that I may have missed in that time period.

 

Fran Giacoma

 


Fran Giacoma
 

To add to John King’s info, in my B&O Baltimore Division Timetables #1 & #2 dated April 27, 1969 and October 25, 1970 respectively, the “Designation and Use of Main Tracks” table contains 5 subdivisions that operate under TTSI-T-105 rule. T-105 in the Timetable Special Instruction (TTSI), lists them and says (I am paraphrasing  and condensing here) that the Train Dispatcher can authorize a train to occupy the main track of the subdivision verbally or by message without train orders. It essentially conveys the same information as Rule S-241, except there is no requirement to use a Clearance Form A. During 1974, I rode an EMD SW-1 pulling the local freight on the Landenberg Subdivision (one of the 5 mentioned) out of Wilsmere Yard and I recall it was done via verbal permission.

 

Interesting the lack of consistency across the different timetables. 

 

Fran Giacoma

 


Christopher Manthey
 

Another place where this authority was used was on the Akron-Chicago Division, CT&V Subdivision, on the portion south (RR east) of Akron to the end of the line in Mineral City.  This portion of the line had only one local turn out of Akron Junction, and the timetable provided:  "The Train Dispatcher may authorize verbally or by message, train or engine to occupy the main track between Mineral City and Akron Jct. without train order, not protecting against extra trains."  So this did not even require a clearance form.  This statement first appeared in Akron-Chicago ETT #84 of April 30, 1967.  At that time it also applied to the Wooster SD, which was subsequently abandoned.  The portion of the CT&V north of Akron to Cleveland still had a couple through trains and locals, so running orders were required on that portion.

Chris Manthey


Edward
 

Here is a Form A from the SIRT.
It was issued at St. George for a roustabout (local freight extra) run to Tottenville and back.
The East Shore and Perth Amboy subdivision at the time handled frequent, 3rd rail powered passenger service.
We had an employee's timetable with us, to avoid conflicts with the passenger runs while switching at sidings.

For the west bound run back to St. George, we got orders from the dispatcher through the station agents at Tottenville (proceed with returning west bound run) and at Pleasant Plains, where we were flagged by the agent.
That order had us back the train onto the Mount Loretto branch and wait an hour for late afternoon passenger traffic to pass.
The conductor then called the dispatcher from a lineside company phone, and we got verbal clearance for a non-stop run to St. George. 

Ed Bommer


Frank Barna
 

So was there a freight yard in Tottenville? Any pics or track diagrams? How far was this yard from the ferry slip?

Carl Barna


From: main@BaltimoreAndOhioRailroadList.groups.io <main@BaltimoreAndOhioRailroadList.groups.io> on behalf of Edward <edb8381@...>
Sent: Sunday, June 27, 2021 12:10 PM
To: main@BaltimoreAndOhioRailroadList.groups.io <main@BaltimoreAndOhioRailroadList.groups.io>
Subject: Re: [BaltimoreAndOhioRailroadList] Clearance Form A
 
Here is a Form A from the SIRT.
It was issued at St. George for a roustabout (local freight extra) run to Tottenville and back.
The East Shore and Perth Amboy subdivision at the time handled frequent, 3rd rail powered passenger service.
We had an employee's timetable with us, to avoid conflicts with the passenger runs while switching at sidings.

For the west bound run back to St. George, we got orders from the dispatcher through the station agents at Tottenville (proceed with returning west bound run) and at Pleasant Plains, where we were flagged by the agent.
That order had us back the train onto the Mount Loretto branch and wait an hour for late afternoon passenger traffic to pass.
The conductor then called the dispatcher from a lineside company phone, and we got verbal clearance for a non-stop run to St. George. 

Ed Bommer


EDWARD LORENCE
 

On Sunday, June 27, 2021, 02:58:24 PM CDT, Frank Barna <cbarna@...> wrote:


So was there a freight yard in Tottenville? Any pics or track diagrams? How far was this yard from the ferry slip?

Carl Barna


From: main@BaltimoreAndOhioRailroadList.groups.io <main@BaltimoreAndOhioRailroadList.groups.io> on behalf of Edward <edb8381@...>
Sent: Sunday, June 27, 2021 12:10 PM
To: main@BaltimoreAndOhioRailroadList.groups.io <main@BaltimoreAndOhioRailroadList.groups.io>
Subject: Re: [BaltimoreAndOhioRailroadList] Clearance Form A
 
Here is a Form A from the SIRT.
It was issued at St. George for a roustabout (local freight extra) run to Tottenville and back.
The East Shore and Perth Amboy subdivision at the time handled frequent, 3rd rail powered passenger service.
We had an employee's timetable with us, to avoid conflicts with the passenger runs while switching at sidings.

For the west bound run back to St. George, we got orders from the dispatcher through the station agents at Tottenville (proceed with returning west bound run) and at Pleasant Plains, where we were flagged by the agent.
That order had us back the train onto the Mount Loretto branch and wait an hour for late afternoon passenger traffic to pass.
The conductor then called the dispatcher from a lineside company phone, and we got verbal clearance for a non-stop run to St. George. 

Ed Bommer


Frank Barna
 




From: main@BaltimoreAndOhioRailroadList.groups.io <main@BaltimoreAndOhioRailroadList.groups.io> on behalf of EDWARD LORENCE <lorence1827@...>
Sent: Sunday, June 27, 2021 8:48 PM
To: main@BaltimoreAndOhioRailroadList.groups.io <main@BaltimoreAndOhioRailroadList.groups.io>
Subject: Re: [BaltimoreAndOhioRailroadList] Clearance Form A
 
On Sunday, June 27, 2021, 02:58:24 PM CDT, Frank Barna <cbarna@...> wrote:


So was there a freight yard in Tottenville? Any pics or track diagrams? How far was this yard from the ferry slip?

Carl Barna


From: main@BaltimoreAndOhioRailroadList.groups.io <main@BaltimoreAndOhioRailroadList.groups.io> on behalf of Edward <edb8381@...>
Sent: Sunday, June 27, 2021 12:10 PM
To: main@BaltimoreAndOhioRailroadList.groups.io <main@BaltimoreAndOhioRailroadList.groups.io>
Subject: Re: [BaltimoreAndOhioRailroadList] Clearance Form A
 
Here is a Form A from the SIRT.
It was issued at St. George for a roustabout (local freight extra) run to Tottenville and back.
The East Shore and Perth Amboy subdivision at the time handled frequent, 3rd rail powered passenger service.
We had an employee's timetable with us, to avoid conflicts with the passenger runs while switching at sidings.

For the west bound run back to St. George, we got orders from the dispatcher through the station agents at Tottenville (proceed with returning west bound run) and at Pleasant Plains, where we were flagged by the agent.
That order had us back the train onto the Mount Loretto branch and wait an hour for late afternoon passenger traffic to pass.
The conductor then called the dispatcher from a lineside company phone, and we got verbal clearance for a non-stop run to St. George. 

Ed Bommer


Frank Barna
 

This doesn't say anything about freight movements at Totenville, or did I miss something?

I understand that at one time there were carfloat operations out of E'port that went down the Author Kill. Was the SIRT involved in this?

Carl Barna
Emmaus, PA


From: main@BaltimoreAndOhioRailroadList.groups.io <main@BaltimoreAndOhioRailroadList.groups.io> on behalf of EDWARD LORENCE <lorence1827@...>
Sent: Sunday, June 27, 2021 8:48 PM
To: main@BaltimoreAndOhioRailroadList.groups.io <main@BaltimoreAndOhioRailroadList.groups.io>
Subject: Re: [BaltimoreAndOhioRailroadList] Clearance Form A
 
On Sunday, June 27, 2021, 02:58:24 PM CDT, Frank Barna <cbarna@...> wrote:


So was there a freight yard in Tottenville? Any pics or track diagrams? How far was this yard from the ferry slip?

Carl Barna


From: main@BaltimoreAndOhioRailroadList.groups.io <main@BaltimoreAndOhioRailroadList.groups.io> on behalf of Edward <edb8381@...>
Sent: Sunday, June 27, 2021 12:10 PM
To: main@BaltimoreAndOhioRailroadList.groups.io <main@BaltimoreAndOhioRailroadList.groups.io>
Subject: Re: [BaltimoreAndOhioRailroadList] Clearance Form A
 
Here is a Form A from the SIRT.
It was issued at St. George for a roustabout (local freight extra) run to Tottenville and back.
The East Shore and Perth Amboy subdivision at the time handled frequent, 3rd rail powered passenger service.
We had an employee's timetable with us, to avoid conflicts with the passenger runs while switching at sidings.

For the west bound run back to St. George, we got orders from the dispatcher through the station agents at Tottenville (proceed with returning west bound run) and at Pleasant Plains, where we were flagged by the agent.
That order had us back the train onto the Mount Loretto branch and wait an hour for late afternoon passenger traffic to pass.
The conductor then called the dispatcher from a lineside company phone, and we got verbal clearance for a non-stop run to St. George. 

Ed Bommer


Edward
 

Freight movements to Tottenville from St. George covered company and private sidings between Clifton Junction and Tottenville.
This was over the the original Staten Island Railway of 1860. 
The yard at Tottenville was small, and mainly served as a coachyard for holding MUE cars  overnight and on weekends for the AM rush to St. George and the ferry to Manhattan,
It had a capacity for 34 freight cars in the coach yard, and four cars at the Tottenville Freight House.

Local freights worked east bound sidings on the run to Tottenville as "extras".
They also could not delay any of the scheduled passenger runs.
On any roustabout either way, not all sidings or freight houses were worked.
Only those getting a delivery, or when picking up empty cars.

The biggest customer near Tottenville was Nassau Smelting, a recycling plant for the Bell System and Western Union.
Scrapped wire and other communication equipment went there to reclaim the copper and other, materials for reuse.
It had a company (SIRT/B&O) siding capacity of 37 cars and a private siding capacity of 35 cars.
The was worked by an east bound run from St. George.

Another freight customer was Mount Loretto, a Roman Catholic home for orphaned and abandoned children.
It had a private lead of about a mile in length, with capacity of 69 cars.
There was also a private station there, and a coal trestle for the home's power plant, with a 6 car capacity.
This customer was worked with a west bound run from Tottenville by the same roustabout on its return trip to St. George.

The attached 1958 track diagrams for the south end of the Perth Amboy subdivision shows the area I've discussed.
A Form 6 with mileage points indicated will show the agents, names and capacities for the yards, sidings and customers.

Ed Bommer
  


Frank Barna
 

Anyone have any photos of these freight stations or track diagrams?

Carl Barna
Emmaus, PA


From: main@BaltimoreAndOhioRailroadList.groups.io <main@BaltimoreAndOhioRailroadList.groups.io> on behalf of Edward <edb8381@...>
Sent: Tuesday, June 29, 2021 12:00 PM
To: main@BaltimoreAndOhioRailroadList.groups.io <main@BaltimoreAndOhioRailroadList.groups.io>
Subject: Re: [BaltimoreAndOhioRailroadList] Clearance Form A
 

Freight movements to Tottenville from St. George covered company and private sidings between Clifton Junction and Tottenville.
This was over the the original Staten Island Railway of 1860. 
The yard at Tottenville was small, and mainly served as a coachyard for holding MUE cars  overnight and on weekends for the AM rush to St. George and the ferry to Manhattan,
It had a capacity for 34 freight cars in the coach yard, and four cars at the Tottenville Freight House.

Local freights worked east bound sidings on the run to Tottenville as "extras".
They also could not delay any of the scheduled passenger runs.
On any roustabout either way, not all sidings or freight houses were worked.
Only those getting a delivery, or when picking up empty cars.

The biggest customer near Tottenville was Nassau Smelting, a recycling plant for the Bell System and Western Union.
Scrapped wire and other communication equipment went there to reclaim the copper and other, materials for reuse.
It had a company (SIRT/B&O) siding capacity of 37 cars and a private siding capacity of 35 cars.
The was worked by an east bound run from St. George.

Another freight customer was Mount Loretto, a Roman Catholic home for orphaned and abandoned children.
It had a private lead of about a mile in length, with capacity of 69 cars.
There was also and a station and coal trestle with a 6 car capacity.
This customer was worked with a west bound run from Tottenville by the same roustabout on its return trip to St. George.

In all, not a lot of heavy reight trdfifc b ut a fair about of tedious work

  


Edward
 

Here is the freight house at Tottenville.
There were some short sidings on the right side, beyond the bridge.

Tottenville Yard was an end-of-branch facility.
It also had a manual turntable (beyond that overpass built in1940) when steam was still being used, up to 1948.
Tottenville Yard had three MUE storage tracks and two passenger platform tracks
The three MUE storage tracks were empty during the day.
This allowed an east bound roustabout to re-organize it's train for handling any deliveries or pickups required along its west bound run, back St. George.

Nassau Station shows the smelting plant in the background.
A long siding stretched past the east bound platform from the north end of the plant's property to the south end.
This was SIRT/B&O track, with a capacity of 37 cars. Inside the plant, accessed by switches at each end of the siding were leads into various buildings.
Privately owned track capacity was 35 cars.
Nassau Smelting, owned by the Bell System, was a high security area.

Another notable shipper of that area  as Altantic Terra Cotta, a half mile south of Nassau Station.
Like Nassau, it also had a station for the convenience of its employees.
Atlantic produced architectural and decorative tile and faience work used in office buildings and theaters nation wide, from the 1890's to the 1930's when it went out of business.
A  team track there held 13 cars.

Ed Bommer 

 


Frank Barna
 

Is the freight house the brick bldg when the track curves to the left?

Carl Barna
Emmaus, PA


From: main@BaltimoreAndOhioRailroadList.groups.io <main@BaltimoreAndOhioRailroadList.groups.io> on behalf of Edward <edb8381@...>
Sent: Tuesday, June 29, 2021 1:12 PM
To: main@BaltimoreAndOhioRailroadList.groups.io <main@BaltimoreAndOhioRailroadList.groups.io>
Subject: Re: [BaltimoreAndOhioRailroadList] Clearance Form A
 

Here is the freight house at Tottenville.
There were some short sidings on the right side, beyond the bridge.

Tottenville Yard was an end-of-branch facility.
It also had a manual turntable (beyond that overpass built in1940) when steam was still being used, up to 1948.
Tottenville Yard had three MUE storage tracks and two passenger platform tracks
The three MUE storage tracks were empty during the day.
This allowed an east bound roustabout to re-organize it's train for handling any deliveries or pickups required along its west bound run, back St. George.

Nassau Station shows the smelting plant in the background.
A long siding stretched past the east bound platform from the north end of the plant's property to the south end.
This was SIRT/B&O track, with a capacity of 37 cars. Inside the plant, accessed by switches at each end of the siding were leads into various buildings.
Privately owned track capacity was 35 cars.
Nassau Smelting, owned by the Bell System, was a high security area.

Another notable shipper of that area  as Altantic Terra Cotta, a half mile south of Nassau Station.
Like Nassau, it also had a station for the convenience of its employees.
Atlantic produced architectural and decorative tile and faience work used in office buildings and theaters nation wide, from the 1890's to the 1930's when it went out of business.
A  team track there held 13 cars.

Ed Bommer 

 


Edward
 

The Tottenville freight house is the white structure with a roll-up end door in the first photo, which looks north. This photo was taken in 1960.
The second photo looks south, showing the Tottenville coach yard and platforms on a weekend in the 1940's, with the Perth Amboy ferry dock in the background.
The third photo shows Nassau station with the white pedestrian bridge and the Nassau Smelting plant. It was taken in the late 1950's.
The large brick building to the left in that photo where the track curves into the plant, is the administrative office building for Nassau Smelting.
When Lucent Technologies closed this plant in the 1990's they leveled it and removed everything. 
The same was basically true of the Procter & Gamble plant at Port Ivory, which at one time had it's own yard, passenger platform, dock, track scale, car float transfer bridge and locomotive. 

Tottenville is a small community at the southern most tip of Staten Island and New York Sstate.
Until the 2000's, Staten Island was a place with small towns separated by farms and undeveloped woodlands, totally unlike any other borough in New York City.
It had some sizable industries, such as P&G, U S Gypsum, Consolidated Edison and Nassau Smelting, all located along the Island's north and west shore.
The SIRT was primarily a commuter road that handled freight for the B&O, much of which was coal for barges and a Consolidated Edison power plant at Travis, built in 1957. 

To get some idea of what I'm trying to show, here is a 1948 photo of the SIRT right of way on the Perth Amboy sub-division near Oakwood Heights, looking south, toward Tottenville.
It was taken on a fan trip. The brakeman of the fan trip special is in the distance, on the left track.  A scheduled train that passed the stopped fan trip special (with some riders on the ground as well with live third rails!) is on its way to Tottenville in the distance, on the right track. 
This entire area is now fully developed with with houses. 

Ed Bommer