Sodering


Frank Barna
 

Greetings - When you Soder your power wires to the rails, do y'all use a sodering iron or sodering gun? What wattage for each do you recommend?

Thanks -

Carl Barna
Emmaus, PA


sailsman@att.net
 

Frank,

For Plastic, the secret is get in and out fast.  It helps to clean and apply flux (not acid) to the rail and wire.  You could even tin the wire.  I use a 140 / 100 watt Weller gun and have had good luck with both the higher (easier to pull the trigger) and lower (safer) positions.  Until you feel confident you could apply damp paper towels to the track on either side of the feeder.

For wood ties, you have more flexibility.

I solder a feeder to every piece of rail, except short pieces, near turnouts, and those I'll solder the rails in the rail joiner.  If this is your approach, the rails should be cleaned to bare ends before inserting into the rail joiners and laying.

Travers, 7-21-21

On Wednesday, July 21, 2021, 07:56:41 PM EDT, Frank Barna <cbarna@...> wrote:


Greetings - When you Soder your power wires to the rails, do y'all use a sodering iron or sodering gun? What wattage for each do you recommend?

Thanks -

Carl Barna
Emmaus, PA


george votruba
 

I used to use alligator clips, hemostats, small metal clamps, etc. as heat sinks near the solder joint to draw off heat and avoid melting plastiic ties.


canoephil
 

Carl, 
Weller 40 watt soldering iron with LED light, small tip, “electrical” rosin core solder, GC Electronics liquid solder flux part number 10-4202, and tip thinner by Thermalelectonics.  Having a clean surfaces is crucial. I use a metal Dremel brush to clean the bottom of the rail, add flux, then tin the surface with a small bit of solder. With an appropriate sized hole drilled between the outer ties,  I solder the wire to the bottom of the rail. The wire tip is bent at ninety degrees. The end of the tip is short and tinned with flux and solder. To get more surface area, I flatten the top of the tip with a Dremel diamond disc.  I do this before I tin the surface. It is true, you need to be fast because the rail should be hot before you add flux or you my get a cold joint. Tinning both surfaces makes this possible. You only need small amounts of solder and it should flow evening across the metal surfaces.

Philip Rockwood


canoephil
 

Oops, I intended the words for Frank and not Carl. My apologies Carl.
Philip


Frank Barna
 

Greetings -- I thank all of you who offered suggestions on my sodering inquiry. Some of you recommended a Weller sodering gun and/or a Weller sodering iron. Are these the same thing or are they two different critters?

Be well, All -

Carl Barna
Emmaus, PA


canoephil
 

Hi Carl,
It is a soldering iron.
Philip


sailsman@att.net
 

Carl,

Two different animals.

The guns looks like a ray gun from Buck Rogers (for those old enough to know).

The soldering iron is a fat pencil like device with lower wattage, usually with heat (power) control on a potentiometer.

Either will work fork track work, with the iron more versatile for soldering other than track.

Travers, 7-21-21

On Wednesday, July 21, 2021, 10:57:59 PM EDT, Frank Barna <cbarna@...> wrote:


Greetings -- I thank all of you who offered suggestions on my sodering inquiry. Some of you recommended a Weller sodering gun and/or a Weller sodering iron. Are these the same thing or are they two different critters?

Be well, All -

Carl Barna
Emmaus, PA